Amwell 2022 review: what you need to know

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Amwell is a digital healthcare platform that offers medical consultations, other medical advice and prescriptions. It also provides urgent care advice and psychiatric services.

This article describes Amwell in detail, including what it offers, how much it costs, and some pros and cons. It also examines how Amwell compares to its competitors and answers some common questions.

Amwell is a digital healthcare brand. Customers can consult doctors and receive prescriptions through its platform.

The company says it offers treatment for more than 50 common health conditions, ranging from infections and acne to Alzheimer’s disease. He also says he offers advice on birth control and emergency care.

Some benefits of using Amwell include:

  • Accessibility: Logging into the Amwell portal can be more convenient and accessible than scheduling a doctor’s appointment.
  • Choice: When more than one competent doctor is available, a person can choose whom to consult.
  • Communication: A live video call option is available for doctor visits. This may be more appropriate than using chat.
  • Privacy: The company claims to use secure data transfers and to comply with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act 1996. This means that all health data, including video calls with doctors, are handled securely and confidentially.
  • Cover: The company accepts payments from health insurance, including payments from UnitedHealthcare.

Some disadvantages include:

  • Cost: Each doctor’s appointment costs at least $79, not including the cost of treatment. Some types of consultation cost more.
  • Applicability: Amwell says its services are not suitable for people with serious or life-threatening illnesses.
  • Limits to prescriptions: The company says it complies with legal restrictions regarding the drugs a doctor can prescribe online, including those for controlled substances.
  • Age Restrictions: Amwell does not provide psychiatric treatment to persons under the age of 18.

People who do not need medical attention for serious conditions but want to see a doctor may find Amwell suitable. Doctors can issue prescriptions and perform routine health checks.

Some of the conditions the Amwell team can help include:

Amwell says its service is not suitable for people seeking treatment for cancer or heart attacks, for example. However, a person can get a second opinion on certain serious health issues.

The company also claims that its service is not appropriate for people with suicidal thoughts or behaviors.

First, a person must create an account by providing personal information. A person can also set up insurance coverage at this stage.

Then, a person chooses which doctor to see, based on the doctor’s experience and ratings.

Once a person has made their selection, they can start the virtual tour immediately using live video or chat. All of this is available on a desktop or through a mobile app.

Among other options, the company offers:

  • Urgent Care: This is for people with conditions such as allergies, acne, cold sores or urinary tract infections.
  • Therapy: This includes therapy for depression and panic attacks, as well as couples counseling.
  • Psychiatry: These services include care and medication for people with anorexia, anxiety disorders, depression or bipolar disorder.
  • Breastfeeding support: A person can get help with common issues such as thrush and sore nipples, as well as advice on returning to work.
  • Nutrition advice: This is suitable for people with diabetes or vitamin deficiencies, for example, as well as people interested in losing weight.
  • Pediatrics: This includes treatment and advice for issues such as ear pain, rashes and bronchitis.
  • women’s health: This includes care for sexually transmitted infections and vulvodynia, for example, as well as advice and prescriptions for birth control. However, an online consultation may not be suitable for people who may need physical exams to check for bleeding between periods or yeast infections.
  • Second opinions: Amwell states that it is not a suitable platform for people with serious illnesses. However, a person can get a virtual second opinion from a specialist on a variety of serious conditions, including cancer, and on surgery and other high-risk treatments.

The cost depends on the type of service a person chooses. For example, a person can expect to pay up to $129 for a therapy session, $279 for an initial psychiatric session, and $109 for follow-up sessions.

The most expensive Amwell service is the second opinion service, which costs around $1,850.

Amwell accepts insurance from a wide range of providers, including Cigna and Affinity.

On TrustPilot, Amwell has a rating of 2.9 stars out of 5, based on over 2,000 reviews. Positive reviews mention that the service was helpful, especially during closings.

Negative reviews cite a wide range of issues, including slow service, slow delivery of prescriptions, and prescriptions not arriving at the pharmacy of choice. Some customers also report being charged twice.

On the Better Business Bureau website, which has not accredited the company, Amwell has a 1 out of 5 star rating based on three reviews.

The bureau says Amwell received 63 complaints over 3 years and closed 23. Customers reported payment, refund and customer support issues, as well as insurance denials.

Here’s how Amwell compares to some of its competitors.

In 2020, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported a 154% increase telehealth visits in March of that year, compared to the same month in 2019, in part due to changing health policies during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Current research suggests that online therapy may be beneficial, although research on its accessibility and effectiveness is still quite limited.

A 2020 review studies comparing online and face-to-face cognitive behavioral therapy sessions for depression have found online therapy to be as effective as in-person therapy.

A 2020 study notes that the benefits of online therapy include reduced costs, no waiting lists, and no travel.

However, a 2014 study mentions concerns about online safety and the adaptability of online programs for the wider range of people using these services, compared to those seeking in-person therapy.

Learn more about the benefits of online therapy.

To get started, a person needs to start creating an account on the Amwell platform, first by selecting their insurance provider. A person can then see the telehealth options available to them.

A person then completes their account by submitting their personal information.

Here are answers to some common questions about Amwell.

Is Amwell for me?

Amwell isn’t for everyone, and the company is open about health issues it can’t address.

For example, it does not provide services for people with many serious health conditions or those who need physical exams.

It should also be noted that the cost can be very high. It is important to consider health care needs, coverage and budget before signing up to use Amwell.

How much does Amwell cost per visit?

The cost depends on the service a person needs. For example, clients can expect to pay around $79 for urgent care appointments.

What types of therapy does Amwell offer?

A person can access psychiatric services for anorexia, anxiety disorders, bipolar disorder, depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, insomnia, and other conditions.

Amwell is a telehealth company. It may be suitable for people who need quick access to a doctor for certain reasons, such as nutrition-related, psychiatric or pediatric care.

Reviews are mixed, with many reporting issues with customer service and payment.

A person cannot use Amwell for medical emergencies, conditions requiring a physical exam, or serious conditions, such as cancer. Additionally, a person cannot obtain certain prescriptions online and there is an age limit for certain services.

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